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Knights Without Parachutes — james norman hall

Eventful Days for the 94th Aero Squadron

dangers of wwi aviation doug campbell eddie rickenbacker ivy league james meissner james norman hall kenneth marr lafayette escadrille raoul lufbery

Eventful Days for the 94th Aero Squadron

The stripped Nieuport wing assumed the flying characteristics of a brick.

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Hall and Rickenbacker Share a Victory

94th aero squadron eddie rickenbacker james norman hall raoul lufbery

Hall and Rickenbacker Share a Victory

There is a peculiar gratification in receiving congratulations from one's squadron for a victory in the air. It is worth more to a pilot than the applause of the whole outside world.

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More of the March 1918 Air War

94th aero squadron eddie rickenbacker james norman hall luckiest man alive wwi

More of the March 1918 Air War

There is so much going on in aviation history of 1918 that there isn't time to blog about each of the events; we'll have to wrap up March with a summary of things that happened this month that we haven't yet covered.

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British Pronunciation Guide to World War 1

james norman hall wwi

British Pronunciation Guide to World War 1

How to Pronounce Ypres, As Recorded by Lafayette Escadrille Pilot James Norman Hall How do you pronounce Ypres? It’s an important name in WWI history, but worrying to the non-French-speaking American afraid to appear ignorant or insulting to an ally. Ee-prez? Eye-pray? Yip-ress? The British, however, had no such worries. Part of James Norman Hall’s introduction to trench warfare (before he returned to the US, wrote Kitchener’s Mob, and then became a Lafayette Escadrille pilot) was instruction in the proper British pronunciation of French words. Hall had pronounced Ypres the French way “which put me under suspicion as a ‘swanker.’” One of...

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100th Anniversary of US Entry into World War 1

albert ball eddie rickenbacker eugene bullard james norman hall jimmy doolittle mick mannock raoul lufbery red baron

100th Anniversary of US Entry into World War 1

Did US Entry Help the Air War? Did the Air War Help US Entry? On April 6, 1917, the US entered the war. What effect did the air war have on US entry, and what effect did US entry have on the air war? We talked to Andy Parks about these questions, who pointed to the experience of his own extended family. Many whose views had started out isolationist were pushed toward patriotism and the war effort as German submarine warfare and the Zimmerman telegram made Germany feel like a real threat, even from across the Atlantic. Andy's grandfather Charles Parks...

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